How Much Teenage Pornography Control Is The Responsibility Of Parents

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This guest blog is brought to you by Tyler Jacobson

How Much Teenage Pornography Control Is the Responsibility of Parents

Parents have a responsibility to protect their children from harm. It’s fair to say any reasonable parent would agree with that statement. From bullies to the unfair pressure society puts on our children, parents have to always be on the lookout.

There is one danger, however, that many parents avoid protecting our children from because the subject matter is uncomfortable.

Discussing sex with our children has been the stuff of jokes between parents, stand-up comedians, and embarrassing stories retold at parties. Why? Because it is a hard thing to talk about.

Sex is viewed as an adult activity, and bringing it into the context of our children feels wrong. Despite how we may feel, however, they need to hear it from us or they’ll find the information somewhere else, and what they find will likely not align with how you want your children to view sex.

Teens and Pornography

We live in a very sexualized society. Before the internet, it was difficult for children to come into contact with any photos or video of anything sexually related. Now, however, not only is pornography free and available with only a simple search engine click, but there is no minimum age limit to access it.

What sort of dangers could this pose to our children? Check out this infographic from the folks at Helpyourteennow.com and check the warning signs near the bottom.

Learn How Pornography Addiction Affects the Teenage Brain – Infographic

How Pornography Addiction Affects the Teenage Brain – Infographic

 

Not only can constant exposure to sex alter our teens’ perception of themselves, but also sex as a whole. Even things as inane as social media can become sexualized almost immediately after its release.

Some social media websites like Chatroulette and Omegle that started out with completely benign intentions have become almost exclusively sexual.

Talking with Our Children About Sex

It’s up to us to prepare our children for life as an adult, and this includes views about sex. If we try to prohibit any knowledge at all, they’ll come across it simply through social osmosis.

So how do we talk to our children about sex? Here are some helpful tips, but feel free to check the full article for more information.

1. Keep it in context.

When something comes up on TV that could be used to start a conversation, start the conversation. Nothing can make an already uncomfortable topic even more awkward than poor timing or forcing it.

2. Be honest.

If you lie about anything, it’ll make it hard for them to trust what you say. If you don’t know the answer to a question, it’s better to admit you don’t know and offer to look up the answer rather than lie about it.

3. Be direct.

Be clear in how you feel about the issue. Don’t use awkward nicknames for body parts or try to speak metaphorically about something they need to know clearly. You’re trying to teach them facts, not confuse them.

 

This guest blog post was donated by Tyler Jacobson

Tyler Jacobson is a father, husband, and freelancer, with experience in writing and outreach for organizations that help troubled teen boys and parents. Tyler has offered personal, humorous and research backed advice to readers on parenting tactics, problems in education, issues with social media, various disorders, addiction, and troublesome issues raising teenage boys. Connect with Tyler on: Twitter | Linkedin

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